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Shape Up! Give Your Pictures Dimension With Glaze and a Curved Surface

Shape Up! Give Your Pictures Dimension With Glaze and a Curved Surface

A bit of glue or spray adhesive is typically all you need to mount a photo print, but it's not always the best way to secure images around unconventional shapes. If you're crafting this holiday season - for instance, making personalized mugs or ornaments - glaze is a much better option to keep your prized artwork secure. It's also a great way to accentuate design details since it adds dimension and dries to a hard, glass-like finish. Here are a few tips to get your creativity flowing:

Glaze Basics

Glaze Basics

Working with glaze isn't the same as other adhesives. Keep these rules of thumb in mind when crafting with this glossy tool:

  • Apply glaze in thin layers so you don't over-saturate your print-out, which may cause wrinkling or ink bleeds.
  • Use the glaze right out of the bottle - don't thin it out with water, as this affects the evenness of the varnish.
  • Apply glaze using a soft paint brush to avoid streaks.
  • One layer of glaze will add a subtle gloss, but additional layers of glaze will give you even more shine.
  • Wait for each layer of glaze to dry before applying the next.
  • Add even more dimension to your artwork with glitter, beads, and other small embellishments.
Pick Your Paper

Pick Your Paper

Just as important as handling the gloss correctly is choosing the best paper for the job. That includes the paper both in and around your craft:

  • Matte photo paper typically works best since it doesn't curl or wrinkle as much as a thinner paper stock when you apply wet glaze.
  • Avoid using a glossy photo paper, since its shiny finish might prevent the glaze from adhering really well.
  • Newspaper and other scrap papers might stain or stick to your project, so protect your work surface with a few pieces of waxed paper instead.
Put Your Creativity into Action

Put Your Creativity into Action

So what kinds of projects can you create with glaze and a curved surface? What about some collage plant baskets? They're a great example of how the glaze technique can be incorporated easily by even the least craft-savvy artist. You'll need a plant basket, a paint brush, a pair of scissors, some glaze and an image or two (depending on how many baskets you'll be decking out).

Print the photos on your PIXMA printer and trim them to your desired size. Next, add some glaze to the entire back of the image and place it where you think it looks best on the basket. Spread glaze over the front of the image, then let dry. You can feature one image per basket, or cover the whole thing in a collage of photos in different shapes and sizes. Don't forget to add additional layers of gloss for more shine and dimension.

References

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